© Joe Decie 2011
I sometimes like to think that if I hadn’t grown up under a (probably self-imposed) cloud of self-doubt and brow knitting self-seriousness when it came to making comics (and life in general), I might make work like that of Joe Decie. It’s beautiful, slightly poetic, slightly tongue in cheek and - dare I say it - redolent with a rather British sense of humour.
As it happens, it’s a good job I don’t try and do work like that, because Joe is much much better at doing this sort of work than anybody else I’ve seen. It’s funny, but dryly, subtly so; in fact, sometimes it feels like the cartoon is laughing at you, they’re that well written. A few, sparse words; comedy timing, ink washes and suddenly, there you go; you’re in Joe’s world of whimsy, wonder and wit.
However, all this unbridled praise seems out-of-keeping with the demure yet mischievous, one-eye-brow-raised spirit of the strips so, in summary: Joe Decie? He’s OK I guess.
He’s got a new book out on Blank Slate called The Accidental Salad. I’m going to buy it next time I see him; in the meantime, you should go out and get it.

© Joe Decie 2011

I sometimes like to think that if I hadn’t grown up under a (probably self-imposed) cloud of self-doubt and brow knitting self-seriousness when it came to making comics (and life in general), I might make work like that of Joe Decie. It’s beautiful, slightly poetic, slightly tongue in cheek and - dare I say it - redolent with a rather British sense of humour.

As it happens, it’s a good job I don’t try and do work like that, because Joe is much much better at doing this sort of work than anybody else I’ve seen. It’s funny, but dryly, subtly so; in fact, sometimes it feels like the cartoon is laughing at you, they’re that well written. A few, sparse words; comedy timing, ink washes and suddenly, there you go; you’re in Joe’s world of whimsy, wonder and wit.

However, all this unbridled praise seems out-of-keeping with the demure yet mischievous, one-eye-brow-raised spirit of the strips so, in summary: Joe Decie? He’s OK I guess.

He’s got a new book out on Blank Slate called The Accidental Salad. I’m going to buy it next time I see him; in the meantime, you should go out and get it.

Sorry Entertainer gets reviewed

The Sorry Entertainer gets a review from Justin Giampaoli! He writes:

The Sorry Entertainer (Things In Panels): The Bristol-based duo of Simon Moreton and Nick Soucek join the newsprint revivalist movement, and I’ll say that I was immediately sold when I read that the contributors included Noah Van Sciver and Lauren Barnett. They are two of my favorite mini-comics creators working in the industry today. Noah’s done-in-one crime story is an effective storytelling tutorial about concise functionality. Paddy Lynch’s piece was full of inky emotion, Thom Ferrier examines our knee-jerk inclination to document everything we see in the New Media Era, and we get a big full page of Rock N’ Roll ‘Restling from David Ziggy Greene. It’s a thing of rare beauty, full of influences from people like Sammy Harkham, Brandon Graham, and Paul Pope. Chris Fairless dazzles with ink washes, and Sam Spina playfully addresses audience expectations, while Richard Worth and Jordan Cullver display a beautiful turn of the century aesthetic, which is a tad hard to read due to the scale. There’s actually a lot more, but those are my favorites. Simply put, this is the way to do an anthology. It doesn’t matter that there really isn’t a unifying theme, and it doesn’t matter that some of the creators are more popular or bigger names than some of the others. They key is that you find really good pieces, you put them in a unique format, and suddenly you’ve accomplished that rare feat, an anthology with few, if any, weak links. I hope we can look forward to future installments of this venture. Grade A.”